A Timeline of the Pearl Harbor Attack


Costly to our Navy was the loss of war vessels, airplanes, and equipment. But more costly to Japan was the effectiveness of its foul attack in immediately unifying America in its determination to fight
and win the war thrust upon it. Here is the actual bombing of the mighty USS
Arizona by Jap planes. These pictures were made by a fearless cameraman who
thought nothing of his personal safety to make possible this record for all
posterity. A single lucky hit was responsible for the disaster that befell
the Arizona when a Jap bomb falling directly through one of the battleships
funnels… The tragedy of Pearl Harbor will forever
be remembered by those who witnessed it, and for future generations to be educated
about this event. But the Pearl Harbor attack did not just happen out of the
blue. It was through a series of events from the World War I and through
strategic planning. World War I increased the issue of racism and
imperialism in Europe. As Japan’s population increased and the economy
worsening, Japanese military influence intensified. On December 7, 1941, at 6:10 a.m., Commander Mitsuo Fuchida Japanese aircraft on Pearl Harbor. The
first wave of planes included 183 fighters, bombers, and torpedo planes. At
6:45 a.m., the USS Ward found the reported submarine to kill. The second shot struck
the submarine at the waterline and it sunk. At 7:20 a.m., an army lieutenant reported
that there were planes 70 miles away. They believed it was the first US B-17
bombers heading for Hawaii. At 7:33 a.m., President Franklin Roosevelt and General George Marshall learned that the Japanese negotiators in Washington were told to break off talks. Marshall sent the warning to General Walter Short in Hawaii, but it
didn’t reach Short’s headquarters until 11:45 a.m., and he didn’t read it until 3:00 p.m. At 7:55 a.m., Commander Logan Ramsey looks out the window on Ford Island and sees low-flying planes that bombs are
being dropped off. The dive bombers struck the Wheeler Field, north of Pearl
Harbor, and Hickam Field. At 8:10 a.m., an armor-piercing bomb pierces the forward deck of the USS Arizona. This created a huge explosion, killing 1,177 men, and it took
nine minutes for the USS Arizona to sink. At 8:50 a.m., the USS Nevada get steamed up in 45 minutes. At 8:54 a.m., the second wave of bombers attacked the drydock and hit the USS Pennsylvania. The oil tanks between the
destroyers. At 10:30 a.m., 2,390 people are dead, and at 1:00 p.m., the Japanese
returned home. The Pearl Harbor attack was a series of
unfortunate events. Japan reached her goal of leaving a scar on Hawaii, and those who fought during the war will forever be remembered. But although Japan did reach their goal of leaving a scar on Hawaii, the United States will fight back harder
as this war only brought people closer together.

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